Tag Archives: Picture

My Predictions For The 2019 Academy Award Nominations

Chocolate Oscar

DISCLAIMER: I posted my predictions the morning of Sunday the 12th. I have made some edits that evening after the Broadcast Film Critics Association’s ‘Critics Choice Awards’ announced their winners.

This is not the earliest I’ve heard of Oscar nominations announced, but it is earlier than usual. Glad things will be back to normal next year. So here are my predictions for the nominations of the 2018 Academy Awards:

BEST PICTURE

  • 1917
  • Ford v. Ferrari
  • The Irishman
  • Jojo Rabbit
  • Joker
  • Little Women
  • Marriage Story
  • Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
  • Parasite
  • Rocketman

BEST DIRECTOR

  • Noah Baumbach – Marriage Story
  • Bong Joon-ho – Parasite
  • Sam Mendes – 1917
  • Martin Scorsese – The Irishman
  • Quentin Tarantino – Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

BEST ACTOR

  • Antonio Banderas – Pain And Glory
  • Leonardo di Caprio – Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
  • Adam Driver – Marriage Story
  • Taron Egerton – Rocketman
  • Joaquin Phoenix – Joker

BEST ACTRESS

  • Cynthia Erivo – Harriet
  • Scarlett Johannson – Marriage Story
  • Saoirse Ronan – Little Women
  • Charlize Theron – Bombshell
  • Renee Zellweger – Judy

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

  • Tom Hanks – A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood
  • Al Pacino – The Irishman
  • Joe Pesci – The Irishman
  • Brat Pitt – Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
  • Song Kang-ho – Parasite

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

  • Kathy Bates – Richard Jewell
  • Laura Dern – Marriage Story
  • Scarlett Johannson – Jojo Rabbit
  • Jennifer Lopez – Hustle
  • Margot Robbie – Bombshell

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

  • Noah Baumbach – Marriage Story
  • Bong Joon-ho – Parasite
  • Rian Johnson – Knives Out
  • Sam Mendes and Kristie Wilson-Cairns – 1917
  • Quentin Tarantino – Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

  • Micah Fitzerman-Blue and Noah Harpster – A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood
  • Greta Gerwig – Little Women
  • Todd Phillips and Scott Silver – Joker
  • Taika Waititi – Jojo Rabbit
  • Steve Zaillian – The Irishman

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

  • Frozen II
  • How To Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World
  • I Lost My Body
  • Missing Link
  • Toy Story 4

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • Roger Deakins – 1917
  • Claire Mathon – Portrait Of A Lady On Fire
  • Phedon Papamichael – Ford v. Ferrari
  • Lawrence Sher – Joker
  • Robert Richardson – Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

  • Ruth E. Carter – Dolemite Is My Name
  • Julian Day – Rocketman
  • Jacqueline Durran – Little Women
  • Arianne Phillips – Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
  • Anna Mary Scott Robbins – Downton Abbey

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

  • American Factory
  • Apollo 11
  • For Sama
  • Honeyland
  • One-Child Nation

BEST FILM EDITING

  • Michael McCusker and Andrew Buckland – Ford v. Ferrari
  • Fred Raskin – Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
  • Thelma Schoonmaker – The Irishman
  • Lee Smith – 1917
  • Yang Jin-mo – Parasite

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

  • Honeyland (North Macedonia)
  • Les Miserables (France)
  • Pain And Glory (Spain)
  • Painted Bird (Czech Republic)
  • Parasite (South Korea)

BEST HAIR AND MAKEUP

  • 1917
  • Bombshell
  • Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

  • Alexandre Desplat – Little Women
  • Hildur Guðnadottir – Joker
  • Randy Newman – Marriage Story
  • Thomas Newman – 1917
  • John Williams – Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

  • “Glasgow (No Place Like Home) – Wild Rose
  • “(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again” – Rocketman
  • “Into The Unknown” – Frozen II
  • “Spirit” – The Lion King
  • “Stand Up” – Harriet

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

  • 1917
  • Ford v. Ferrari
  • The Irishman
  • Joker
  • Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

BEST SOUND MIXING

  • Ford v. Ferrari
  • Joker
  • Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
  • Rocketman
  • Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker

BEST SOUND EDITING

  • 1917
  • Avengers: Endgame
  • Ford v. Ferrari
  • Joker
  • Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

  • 1917
  • Avengers: Endgame
  • The Irishman
  • The Lion King
  • Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

I not only made predictions for nominations, but also for possible upsetters for my main predictions. Some could be the type rewarded in minor awards but overlooked by major awards. And some could be shunned altogether only to take the Academy by surprise. Once again, I only predicted upsetters for all the major categories and any minor categories I had a hunch about. Enough of me rambling. Here is my list for the most likely upsetters:

BEST PICTURE

  • Knives Out
  • The Two Popes

BEST DIRECTOR

  • Greta Gerwig – Little Women
  • Todd Phillips – Joker

BEST ACTOR

  • Christian Bale – Ford v. Ferrari
  • Robert de Niro – The Irishman

BEST ACTRESS

  • Awkwafina – The Farewell
  • Lupita Nyong’o – Us

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

  • Jamie Foxx – Just Mercy
  • Anthony Hopkins – The Two Popes

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

  • Nicole Kidman – Bombshell
  • Zhao Shuzhen – The Farewell

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

  • Jez Butterworth, John-Henry Butterworth and Jason Keller – Ford v. Ferrari
  • Emily Halpern, Sarah Haskins, Susanna Fogel and Katie Silberman – Booksmart

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

  • Matthew Carnahan and Mario Correa – Dark World
  • Anthony McCarten – The Two Popes

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

  • Alita: Battle Angel
  • The Lion King

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • Dick Pope – Motherless Brooklyn
  • Rodrigo Prieto – The Irishman

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

  • Mark Bridges – Joker
  • Jeny Temime – Judy

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

  • The Cave
  • Maiden

BEST FILM EDITING

  • Jeff Groth – Joker

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

  • Atlantics (Senegal)
  • Truth And Justice (Estonia)

BEST HAIR AND MAKEUP

  • Joker
  • Judy

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

  • Michael Abels – Us
  • Daniel Pemberton – Motherless Brooklyn

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

  • “Speechless” – Aladdin
  • “A Glass Of Soju” – Parasite

BEST SOUND MIXING

  • The Irishman

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

  • Alita: Battle Angel
  • Captain Marvel

And those are my predictions for the nominations of this year’s Academy Awards. The actual nominees will be revealed at 5:30 Los Angeles time Monday morning. Nobody likes waking up that early on a Monday, but this is the only time it’s worth it!

Movie Review: The Room (2003)

There’s one thing about really bad movies. Most of which get lost into oblivion. Many bad Hollywood movies get to be laughing stocks forever. And then there are some that develop a cult following often as audience participation movies. The most legendary is the Rocky Horror Picture Show: the raunchy musical that made no sense and lives on as an audience participation free-for-all. There hasn’t been a movie that could replace the Rocky Horror Picture Show or even rank well with it. There was an attempt from 1995’s Showgirls many years earlier but it didn’t pan out. The latest one to enter the flock is 2003’s The Room. It has developed a huge cult following too. But will it replace the Rocky Horror Picture Show in terms of being an audience participation phenom?

The film was written, directed and produced by Tommy Wiseau who also plays the lead character Johnny. The film stars as Johnny comes home to his fiancee Lisa. He’s a successful banker with a loving relationship with Lisa who’s a successful real estate agent. His young friend Denny, an orphaned kid with a troubled upbringing, comes to visit but has to leave because of… you get the idea. After Johnny leaves, we learn Lisa is bored with Johnny and is more interested in Mark, his best friend. Lisa and Mark end up making more than love, so to speak. Lisa’s mother insists that she marries Johnny because of his stability. Later Johnny doesn’t get the promotion promised to him. Johnny later learns of talk from Lisa’s best friend that things aren’t going right and start suspecting things. Johnny soon finds out that Denny has been getting into drugs. Not even Johnny’s friend Peter, a psychologist, can help him with his issues. Finally Johnny’s surprise birthday party happens and the truth comes out. At the end Johnny commits suicide and Mark tells Lisa how selfish she is over Johnny’s dead bloody body.

Okay you can draw out your own conclusion through my description of the movie. But the key ingredient towards its awfulness has to be the lines. Laughing moments happen more often than they should. Playing football happens at the most awkward times. ‘Future wife’ is said instead of ‘fiancee.’ “Everything’s going to to be fine” is uttered more often than it should. But the real creme de la creme of lousiness comes with the lines uttered only once: “You’re tearing me apart, Lisa!” “I feel like I’m sitting on an atomic bomb waiting for it to go off.” “Everybody betrayed me! I fed up with the world.” “You betrayed me… you that good… you, you’re just a chicken, chirp-chirp-chirp-chirp, cheep, cheep.” “Why Lisa, why? Please talk to me! Please!” Yeah, that bad. If the bad lines weren’t enough, there were also fight scenes that looked like they weren’t coordinated at all, cinematography that was bad, story lines that made no sense at all, and love-making scenes set to R&B music that came across as cheesy as hell. Even the end scene as people cry over Johnny’s dead body leaves the audience laughing. All this made over a budget of $6,000,000? And to think Tommy first tried to market it as a drama but then marketed it as a black comedy. That adds to its weirdness it’s already garnered.

You’d think a movie like that would be too insufferable to watch, right? Well some people somewhere sometime ago turned this into an audience participation movie and that’s where its success came. People dress up as their favorite characters. People throw things around like spoons, food and footballs during certain scenes.  People say “Hi…” and “Bye…” whenever a character enters or exits. People hurl insults and lewd comments during the scenes. People shout “Go, go, go!” during the landscape shots. People also reenact the cheesy lines as they come during the movie. It’s a lot like Rocky Horror. Over at the screening I saw at Vancouver’s Rio Theatre, there was one host dressed up as Tommy Wiseau reenacting his voice and holding an impression contest before the movie was aired. The theatre was filled with mostly twentysomethings; some dressed up as the characters. In the end, the movie is not the same without the audience participation. Sure you could watch it alone on your DVD and laugh but it’s not as fun without the crowd.

It’s already garnered a cult following in the last few years. Will The Room ever achieve the same cult status as Rocky Horror? I doubt it. It hasn’t stood the test of time that Rocky Horror has. The Room’s test of time is something only the future will tell. Also while I’ve never heard of any cast or crew from Rocky Horror often showing up at screenings, occasionallyTommy Wiseau will make a guest appearance at certain screenings of The Room. He wasn’t here in Vancouver, at least this time.

In conclusion, it’s no wonder that The Room is labeled the Citizen Kane of bad movies. The cult following of audience participation is a celebration of its lousiness and makes for a fun night out at the movies. Prepare to laugh like you never laughed before.

2010 Oscars Best Picture Nominee: 127 Hours

Imagine you’re stuck in a canyon with your hand crushed by a heavy boulder and holding you stuck inside. Think that couldn’t happen to you? It happened to Aron Ralston in 2003. His story became the subject of the movie 127 Hours. It doesn’t sound like a movie that would catch your eye but it will surprise you.

SPOILER WARNING: This review will have some spoilers of the movie’s plot and even the ending.

The movie starts with Aron Ralston cycling in Utah’s Canyonland National Park. This is a favorite past-time for the avid 27 year-old mountain climber who had learned to love nature ever since he was a boy. He spots some young girls hiking the canyon for the first time and plays a tour guide. He even leads them to a part of the canyon where one can let go of their grip and fall into a canyon lake. Aron videotapes it all. After they leave him and tell of a party later on, he heads into more terrain of the canyon. One cliff has a boulder between the two edges. Aron puts pressure on the boulder while crossing the edges but the boulder comes loose. Aron falls and as he hits the ground, the boulder crushes his right hand and leaves him stuck in a desolate area 15 feet below the cliff. He can’t free himself. He has no cellphone with him. He told no one of his whereabouts. He knows he will die.

During the time down there, he takes out from his backpack whatever vital items he feels necessary, like a sandwich wrap, water bottle, digital watch to clock his time down, the one pocketknife he has, plastic container and a video camera. With the video camera, he videotapes his ordeal often speaking what his thoughts are. He confesses of his carelessness before the trip of not telling anyone where he’d be going. He confesses to his family about not fully appreciating them while alive. He has constant visions and recollections about his past: the good times and the mistakes he made. He even has a premonition of a young boy on a sofa.

During the whole time there, he has to eat and drink enough to keep him alive, such as eating the sandwich wrap, drinking a small amount of water at a time and even drinking his own urine he conserved. It isn’t until five days later he moves his arm out where there’s a free boneless area. He makes a crucial decision to amputate his arm with the dull knife. Finally after braking free, he descends from the canyon wall, drinks a dirty puddle of water and runs eight miles to the nearest help. His ordeal makes national news. At the end of the film, we see the real-life Aron with his wife and holding his son. The premonition of the boy came true.

The movie doesn’t sounds like something that would be entertaining but director Danny Boyle managed to turn it into a watchable entertaining movie. Inclusion of the flashbacks and even other film parts make it entertaining. The amputation scene has to be the hardest to watch. Some viewers who saw it at its debut at the Toronto Film Festival fainted when they saw it. However Danny Boyle insisted that it had to look realistic. Makeup Artist Tony Gardiner worked with medical professionals to make the amputated wound look as medically accurate as possible.

Danny Boyle succeeded again in making an excellent film. James Franco did an excellent job in playing Aron. A.H. Rahman also did an excellent job with the original music. Cinematography of the natural landscape was also excellent.

127 Hours isn’t for everybody and definitely not the faintest of hearts. Despite whatever gruesome details I revealed here, I have to say it was a deep and excellent triumph of the human spirit. It will leave one walking out of the theatre moved.